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Coronavirus updates: Death toll tops 20,000 in New York state

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Coronavirus updates: Death toll tops 20,000 in New York state

A pandemic of new coronavirus it has killed more than 263,000 people worldwide.

More than 3.7 million people worldwide have been diagnosed with COVID-19, the disease caused by the new respiratory virus, according to Dice compiled by the Center for Science and Systems Engineering at Johns Hopkins University. The actual numbers are believed to be much larger due to the scarcity of tests, many unreported cases and suspicions that some governments are hiding the reach of their countries' outbreaks.

Since the first cases were detected in China in December, the United States became the most affected country, with more than 1.2 million diagnosed cases and at least 73,573 deaths.

Today's biggest developments:

McDonald & # 39; s officials lifted coronavirus restrictions, according to police China reduces all areas to low risk for COVID-19 Russia reports daily increase in cases of COVID-19 virus circulating in France in mid-January

See how the news is developing today. All the time oriental. Refresh this page for updates.

3:20 pm: Michigan Governor Extends Home Stay Request and OKs Manufactures to Continue Next Week

Michigan Governor Gretchen Whitmer said she would extend her state's home stay request from May 15 to 28.

The governor, however, will ease some of the restrictions imposed to fight the coronavirus. She said she would allow Michigan factories, including car factories, to resume on May 11.

"Manufacturing is an important part of our economy, there is no doubt. And when we do risk assessment, we feel comfortable with these safety protocols that we can safely participate in again," she said.

PHOTO: This photo provided by Michigan Governor, Michigan Governor Gretchen Whitmer, speaks about the state during a speech in Lansing, Michigan, April 29, 2020. (Michigan Governor's Office via AP, Pool)

Whitmer said the big three automakers and the UAW will start working at 25% capacity.

Last week, Whitmer issued new executive orders that extended the state's emergency order after the Republican-led legislature voted not to extend it after April 30. She faced requests from some leaders and opponents, who held rallies in the state capital, to reopen the state.

The story continues

As of Thursday, Michigan had 45,646 cases of coronavirus and 4,343 deaths, the governor said. The average number of seven-day cases fell 15% from last week, according to Whitmer.

14:05: Amtrak requires passengers to wear masks

Amtrak has announced that it will apply new rules for passengers and change its service to offer better security during the pandemic.

As of May 11, all customers who are at stations, trains and buses will be required to wear facial coverage.

Photo: A lone passenger sleeps in an empty Amtrak car as the train arrives at Penn Station on April 9, 2020 in Baltimore. (Rob Carr / Getty Images)Photo: A lone passenger sleeps in an empty Amtrak car as the train arrives at Penn Station on April 9, 2020 in Baltimore. (Rob Carr / Getty Images)

"The safety of Amtrak's customers and employees is our top priority," the railway operator said in a statement.

The company added that it will reduce the coach class and business class to 50% capacity and run out of money at its stations. Markers will be placed on the floor of trains, stations and other areas to help customers distance themselves socially, according to Amtrak.

13:42: Texas cases grow more than 900, Massachusetts sees more than 1,700 new cases

The number of new COVID-19 cases in Texas continues to grow as the state eases its restrictions on businesses.

The state registered 968 cases on Thursday, bringing the total number of coronavirus cases to 35,390, according to Texas health officials. There have been 973 deaths reported across the state, a jump of 25 from Wednesday.

Governor Greg Abbott has allowed certain stores to reopen last weekend, including restaurants and retail, and this weekend the hair and nail salons can resume.

In Massachusetts, Governor Charlie Baker warned that the state had a lot of work to do after suffering a spike in cases.

On Thursday, there were 72,025 confirmed cases of COVID-19, an increase of 1,754 over the previous day, state health officials said. Massachusetts recorded 208 new deaths on Thursday, bringing the total to 4,420.

13:34: Pentagon requires new military recruits to obtain an exemption if they are hospitalized by COVID

US officials confirmed to ABC News that the Pentagon has instituted a "provisional orientation" for those who have been hospitalized for the virus and want to enlist in the armed forces.

These individuals would be considered medically disqualified and would have to obtain an exemption from service to join the armed forces, according to the officer. The Pentagon is concerned that hospitalization could affect the lungs and other organs of the potential recruit, the official said.

The policy is still evolving, the official said.

The Pentagon said that on Thursday 5,086 service members contracted the disease. Of those members, 1,913 have recovered, according to the Pentagon.

11:45 am: New research finds that viruses circulated in France in mid-January

An analysis by a private non-profit research institution in Paris found that the new coronavirus had been circulating in France since at least January.

Researchers at the Pasteur Institute analyzed a large number of patient samples collected in France between 24 January and 24 March, and analyzed different strains of the virus, their relationship with each other and the genetic diversity of the different strains that circulate in France. The researchers compared this with international data, working with scientists from Europe, Asia and North America.

The analysis showed that the virus was already circulating at a low level in France in mid-January and that people infected with this strain had not recently traveled to China. These individuals tended to have mild or none symptoms, according to a report by the Pasteur Institute.

PHOTO: Cars drive on Champs Elysee avenue, overlooking the Arc de Triomphe in the background, in Paris, France, on May 7, 2020. (Christophe Ena / AP)PHOTO: Cars drive on Champs Elysee avenue, overlooking the Arc de Triomphe in the background, in Paris, France, on May 7, 2020. (Christophe Ena / AP)

France reported its first confirmed case of COVID-19 in the southwestern city of Bordeaux on 24 January. It was also the first reported case in Europe. This case and several others that followed were all related to travel from China. Then, days after a major outbreak in Italy in late February, several cases reported in France were related to people who had recently traveled to Italy or were in close contact with someone who had it.

But the findings of the Pasteur Institute refute this travel-based narrative.

PHOTO: Airparif's weather balloon, the organization responsible for monitoring air quality in the Ile de France region, flies next to the Eiffel Tower in Paris on May 7, 2020. (Joel Saget / AFP via Getty Images)PHOTO: Airparif's weather balloon, the organization responsible for monitoring air quality in the Ile de France region, flies next to the Eiffel Tower in Paris on May 7, 2020. (Joel Saget / AFP via Getty Images)

The report is supported by separate research by Dr. Yves Cohen, a chief of intensive care in Paris, who retested the samples that French hospitals had taken from patients with pneumonia in December and January and retrospectively identified a positive case of COVID-19 from the Parisian suburb of Bondy on 27 December. The patient in this case had not traveled to China or Italy.

Cohen told the French press that the man may be France's "zero patient". He asked doctors to re-test all samples from patients with pneumonia.

With more than 174,000 diagnosed cases of COVID-19 and more than 25,000 deaths, France is one of the countries most affected by the coronavirus pandemic, according to a count maintained by Johns Hopkins University. The European country has been in a national blockade since March 17, although French Prime Minister Edouard Philippe announced Thursday that the country will begin to ease restrictions on Monday.

11:24: US official who works at the White House tests positive for viruses

A member of the US service who works at the White House tested positive for the new coronavirus.

President Donald Trump and Vice President Mike Pence had negative tests for the virus, according to White House spokesman Hogan Gidley.

"We were recently notified by the White House Medical Unit that a member of the United States Army, who works on the White House campus, tested positive for coronavirus," Gidley said in a statement on Thursday. "Since then, the president and vice president have been negative for the virus and remain in excellent health."

PHOTO: The White House. (AFP via Getty Images)PHOTO: The White House. (AFP via Getty Images)

CNN, that first reported the news said that the individual is a member of the U.S. Navy who serves as one of Trump's personal valets, part of an elite military unit that often works closely with the president and the first family.

10:45 am: Up to 190,000 people could die of COVID-19 in Africa if left unchecked, WHO warns

A new study by the World Health Organization estimates that some 190,000 people in Africa could die from the new coronavirus and up to 44 million could be infected in the first year of the pandemic if containment measures fail.

The researchers responsible for the study, based on forecasting modeling, analyzed 47 African countries with a total population of 1 billion. The model projects the slowest rate of transmission observed, the lowest age of people with serious illnesses and the lowest mortality rates compared to what is seen in the most affected countries in the rest of the world.

PHOTO: Passengers follow physical distance measures while lining up at the Germiston taxi stand, near Johannesburg, South Africa, on May 7, 2020. (Luca Sola / AFP via Getty Images)PHOTO: Passengers follow physical distance measures while lining up at the Germiston taxi stand, near Johannesburg, South Africa, on May 7, 2020. (Luca Sola / AFP via Getty Images)

The lower rate of transmission, however, suggests a more prolonged outbreak in some years, according to the study.

"Although COVID-19 is unlikely to spread as exponentially in Africa as in other parts of the world, it is likely to burn at transmission access points," said Dr. Matshidiso Moeti, WHO regional director for Africa, in a statement on Thursday. -market. "COVID-19 could become an important element in our lives for years to come, unless a proactive approach is taken by many governments in the …

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